humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."

(Dharamshala, India)

1,326 notes

picturemylifeinfullview:

askingdannyworsnop:

charlie-in-a-beanie:

dutchnorkat:

skankmcmeow:

I see your shifting gaze, that disgusted glance. I know you’re questioning my parenting from across the elementary school assembly.

Let me tell you a little story about the kindergarten student with bright purple hair, my little Raven Marie…

A month before school started she decided to play hair stylist with the craft scissors, and to save what was left I had to opt for a pixie cut. She was absolutely devastated. It was about three hours before she stopped her harsh sobbing and hiccups.

Why?

She has thought that the length of a girls hair was what made her “girly”. I know I’ve personally had many hairstyles around her before, including a purple mohawk, which many people criticized as not being “girly” enough. Media, other children, other parents, and society made it worse. She would randomly burst in tears while out in public for the first week of her new style, screaming that she looked like a boy. That everyone would think she’s a boy.

At one point she took off her bow in her hair, threw it at a cashier and screamed, “I DON’T NEED THIS BOW TO TELL YOU THAT I’M NOT A BOY, BECAUSE I’M NOT”

Proudly stomping away in her blue jean overalls, head held high.

Once we edged closer to the first day of school she kept asking questions like, “Do you think the other kids will like me? Do you think they’ll be my friend? Will they think I’m a boy? Will they pick on me because I have boy hair?”

So I went to the grocery store, bought some dye, and spent the whole night transforming my bright blonde little girl into a plum punk rock fairy. I then assured her that if any of the kids didn’t like her, they were just jealous.

As for you, mothers and teachers with the wandering eyes filled with disgust and judgement, I’m in the business of raising a free spirit.

Here’s to you, Raven Marie. I love you.

SHE’S THE CUTEST OHMAHGOD CAN I HUG HER

I want that hair

Parenting done awesome .

I wish to be this kind of parent

(via sabrijuana)

119,794 notes

[on diversity in media] I think its social responsibility. I think it’s our responsibility to stand up and say what we want. It think if you look at television in the past two years, it’s becoming the decade of the female. Like, all these new shows with female leads. Even if you look at television, as well as cable, as well as films, there’s been a resurgence, as far as the leading woman in Hollywood, which is great. And I think we’re also at the point now…you know, it’s interesting…x

(Source: forassgard, via arseniccupcakes)

29,326 notes

"

When a white teenager named Steve Lohner was stopped by the police last month and refused to show his ID after carrying a loaded shotgun on the streets of Aurora, Colorado (the same city where a mass murderer killed 12 people and injured 70 others in a packed movie theater in July 2012), the teen walked away with nothing but a citation.

But when a 22-year-old black kid named John Crawford picked up a mere BB gun in a Walmart store in Dayton, Ohio last week, customers called the police, who then shot and killed him.

Here lies a racial disparity that’s difficult for honest people to ignore. How can black people openly carry a real gun when we can’t even pick up a BB gun in a store without arousing suspicion? The answer in America is that the Second Amendment doesn’t really apply to black people.

"

Keith Boykin, "Does the Second Amendment Only Apply to White People?" (via holygoddamnshitballs)

True, anyone who’s been paying attention knows this. The only time you can get gun control passed in this country is when politicians start seeing POC walking around freely with guns.

(via questionall)

(via arseniccupcakes)

7,509 notes

Sora: I've been having these weird thoughts lately
Sora: like, is any of this real...
Sora: or nort
988 notes

(Source: pleatedjeans, via imalexcited)

44,554 notes

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric. He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.
In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric.
He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.

In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.
He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

(via themetalgentleman)

27,962 notes

(Source: moosekleenex)

1,854 notes

fatherstomychildren:

Idris Elba

fatherstomychildren:

Idris Elba

(via contextualdisorders)

45 notes

rjsalmond:

damjerry:

merakimaker:

vancity604778kid:

ultrafacts:




Source Click HERE to Follow the Ultrafacts Blog!




ALICE ROOSEVELT WAS HARDCORE. “She was known as a rule-breaker in an era when women were under great pressure to conform. The American public noticed many of her exploits. She smoked cigarettes in public, swore at officials, rode in cars with men, stayed out late partying, kept a pet snake named Emily Spinach (Emily as in her spinster aunt and Spinach for its green color) in the White House, and was seen placing bets with a bookie. 


Rock on.

Was the entire Roosevelt family bad ass bosses?

"Emily Spinach" laughing forever I love it

rjsalmond:

damjerry:

merakimaker:

vancity604778kid:

ultrafacts:

Source Click HERE to Follow the Ultrafacts Blog!

ALICE ROOSEVELT WAS HARDCORE. “She was known as a rule-breaker in an era when women were under great pressure to conform. The American public noticed many of her exploits. She smoked cigarettes in public, swore at officials, rode in cars with men, stayed out late partying, kept a pet snake named Emily Spinach (Emily as in her spinster aunt and Spinach for its green color) in the White House, and was seen placing bets with a bookie. 

Rock on.

Was the entire Roosevelt family bad ass bosses?

"Emily Spinach" laughing forever I love it

(via tessaviolet)

65,460 notes